A collection of COVID-19 resources from trusted publications and healthcare professionals around the world.

This resource library is a compilation of COVID-19 cases and resources.
Join healthcare professionals from around the world in sharing real-time clinical knowledge and first-hand experiences.

UPDATED JUNE 2, 2020

Upcoming Q&A: End of life planning

Do your loved ones know your end-of-life wishes? How do you guide patients and their families through making those same decisions?

Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider, an internal medicine physician in California, is passionate about improving end-of-life experiences for patients and their families. In 2017, she founded the End Well Project, an initiative dedicated to the belief that all people should experience the end of life in a way that reflects their goals. 

Have questions or an experience you'd like to share with Dr. Ungerleider? Post them in the comments. She'll be responding on June 11, 2020.

Join the discussion

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UPDATED MAY 15, 2020

COVID-19 Q&A: Coping during the pandemic

Are you a recent medical school graduate, resident, physician, nurse, physician assistant, respiratory therapist, or other healthcare provider that has found yourself thrust into caring for COVID-19 patients? How has this experience impacted your mental health? How is it impacting the people around you?

 

Join Dr. Jessica Gold, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis, for a discussion on coping during the pandemic. 

 

Share your questions and comments with Dr. Gold. She'll be responding on May 21, 2020.

Join the discussion

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UPDATED MAY 15, 2020

From Brief19: Briefing From The Editor—This Is Not The Flu

In a Viewpoint appearing in JAMA Internal Medicine, Carlos del Rio (Emory University) and I argue that the method by which seasonal influenza deaths are estimated render them inappropriate for comparisons with covid-19.

The CDC uses complicated algorithms to generate their yearly flu death estimates, which range from 24,000 to 60,000 annually. Meanwhile, covid-19 deaths are being counted directly and in just over two months have caused over 80,000 deaths in the United States. What hospitals are seeing today does not comport with numbers that make flu and covid-19 appear remotely similar...

 

– Jeremy Samuel Faust, MD, MS, MA

Editor-in-Chief

 

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED MAY 8, 2020

5 evidence-based P's to manage ARDS

As the pandemic continues, many clinicians from specialties outside of critical care medicine are finding themselves managing critically-ill patients. 

 

In support of his non-ICU colleagues, Dr. Raj Dasgupta shared his latest pearl: 5 evidence-based P’s to manage ARDS.

Still have questions about managing ARDS? Ask in the comments. He’ll be answering them on May 14, 2020.

 

Ask your questions

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UPDATED MAY 7, 2020

From Brief19: New York data on hydroxychloroquine use shows no benefit

Medical advice should be given by physicians, not celebrities. In March, Elon Musk initiated an internet rumor that chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) were likely to be effective treatments against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes covid-19. Several days later, President Trump tweeted similar sentiments. Approximately one week after Musk's tweet, the first related poisoning in a patient was reported. Many studies have since assessed whether these drugs play a role in improving covid-19 outcomes. To date, the body of evidence suggests that these drugs have either no effect or are harmful on balance.

 

Read the full Brief19

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UPDATED MAY 4, 2020

From Brief19: Covid-19 and blood clots? Dermatologists weigh in

A case report posted for public viewing in a Google Document by a team of investigators led by a Yale physician describes the biopsy findings of a 22-year old otherwise healthy man with suspected covid-19 who developed small blood clots in his feet. The patient reported that the rash caused burning and pain. A previous report by another team of researchers described a covid-19 patient with similar skin findings...

 

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 30, 2020

COVID-19 Q&A: Do you have questions about how clinical trials are progressing?

Dr. Christopher O’Connor, the President & Founder of Think Research and a practicing critical care physician at Trillium Health Partners in Toronto, Canada, and Dr. Ramy Saleh, the Founder of Airmed Trials and a practicing medical oncologist and researcher at the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Canada, will be answering your questions about COVID-19 clinical trials on May 6, 2020.

 

Ask a question

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UPDATED APRIL 28, 2020

From Brief19: SARS-CoV-2 spread in an air-conditioned restaurant in China

As the nation continues to discuss relaxing social distancing rules and reopening restaurants, a new report from China should serve as a cautionary tale. The authors of the paper report on ten people from three separate families who were infected in a restaurant. As seen in the figure above, Family A traveled from Wuhan and arrived in Guangzhou on January 23, 2020. The next day, Patient A1 ate lunch with three other family members. Families B and C were located next to Patient A1. Later that day Patient A1 became symptomatic with fever and cough and went to the hospital. Within 12 days (February 5th), nine other people who were at the restaurant had become ill from covid-19...

 

Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 27, 2020

New aerosol design shields health care workers during Intubation

One of the greatest risks for health care workers is intubating critically ill COVID-19 patients that have developed respiratory failure. Houston Methodist has designed an aerosol container to help shield them from expelled air during this process.

 

Watch the video

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UPDATED APRIL 24, 2020

From Brief19: Chloroquine trial halted. High doses deemed too harmful

To-date there have been a handful of trials published describing the investigational use of hydroxychloroquine and its parent compound chloroquine during the pandemic. Most of these studies have been negative, and no trial has shown convincing evidence either drug should be used for covid-19 despite widespread adoption around the country. A new study hot off the press today in JAMA Network Open is another setback.

 

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 24, 2020

COVID-19 screening tool

Thanks to Ada for sharing its COVID-19 symptom checker. As the virus continues to spread, they want to help others prepare and protect themselves. This assessment tool incorporates guidance from the WHO, CDC, and ECDC. If you or someone close to you is feeling unwell, you can use this COVID-19 assessment and screener to check symptoms and and get advice on what to do next.

 

Get started

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UPDATED APRIL 23, 2020

From Brief19: Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and Covid-19 update

Previously on Brief19, we addressed how the SARS-CoV-2 virus enters the lungs and a debate as to whether medications known as renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RAASi) worsen or improve clinical outcomes in patients with covid-19. Three new papers provide some insight...

 

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 22, 2020

COVID-19 Q&A: Fever syndromes, hyperinflammation, and cytokine storms

Have questions about fever syndromes, hyperinflammation, or cytokine storms associated with COVID-19? Uncertain how to differentiate between rheumatic disease, rheumatic flares, or COVID-19 infection with rheumatic fevers?

 

Dr. Shikha Mittoo (@rheumatlarge), a community-based rheumatologist appointed at University Health Network in Toronto, Canada, will be answering your questions on April 29, 2020 on these topics, and discussing the management strategies she's using for her patients during the pandemic

Ask a question

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UPDATED APRIL 22, 2020

Innovative helmet may help COVID-19 patients avoid intubation

Only the most severe COVID-19 patients require a stay in the ICU. While their care begins with nasal cannula oxygen, it may quickly progress to intubation, which can put health care providers at risk.

With these concerns in mind, director of critical care Faisal Masud, MD, began seeking for clinical alternatives to intubation. One innovative device—the helmet—was brought to his attention by Houston Methodist Chief Academic Officer, Dirk Sostman, MD.

Learn more

Provided by Houston Methodist

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UPDATED APRIL 22, 2020

From Brief19: COVID-19 cases are up in the United States. But where are the heart attacks?

During the coronavirus crisis in the United States, many emergency departments have experienced lower overall patient volumes, despite ever increasing numbers of severe and critically ill patients who have been diagnosed with and treated for COVID-19. There are several proposed explanations for the decrease in ER visits that have been reported all over the country. Some have noted that because of shelter-in-place orders and telecommuting, fewer accidents are taking place. But a decrease in the number of accidents is unlikely to account for all or even most of the drop in overall emergency medicine caseloads…

 

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 20, 2020

From Brief19: COVID-19 cases are up in the United States. But where are the heart attacks?

During the coronavirus crisis in the United States, many emergency departments have experienced lower overall patient volumes, despite ever increasing numbers of severe and critically ill patients who have been diagnosed with and treated for COVID-19. There are several proposed explanations for the decrease in ER visits that have been reported all over the country. Some have noted that because of shelter-in-place orders and telecommuting, fewer accidents are taking place. But a decrease in the number of accidents is unlikely to account for all or even most of the drop in overall emergency medicine caseloads… Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 17, 2020

From Brief19: What’s going on with Gilead’s remdesivir clinical trial?

Concerning news emerged on social media on Friday when some observers noted that Gilead Sciences, the pharmaceutical company that makes remdesivir, has once again changed the protocol of their phase 3 randomized clinical trial to assess for effectiveness in treating covid-19. (Remdesivir is an investigational drug that is not approved for any condition.) The sample size in the previously published protocol stated that 2,400 patients would be recruited to the study. That plan has now been altered and increased to 6,000 patients...

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 17, 2020

From Brief19: Headline Misleads On Remdesivir Data. Two Patients In Study Died. Was That More Or Less Than Expected?

An "exclusive" article in the medicine and health publication STAT News states that data from patients with severe covid-19 "suggests'' that patients are "responding" to remdesivir, an anti-viral medication made by Gilead that inhibits some viruses from replicating. The news item is based on a video describing of some of the findings of an ongoing study, which has no control group which was obtained by STAT. In the video, the lead physician overseeing the study at the University of Chicago states that thus far only two patients have died, out of 113 severe cases. However, in a previous study in China, zero patients with "severe" illness died (all deaths came from cases classified as "critical"). Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 17, 2020

Critical Care Practitioner Podcast 133: COVID-19 Guideline Based Ventilator Strategies

Having previously trained as a respiratory therapist, Dr. Ollie Poole reviews two sets of recently published clinical guidelines on COVID-19 ventilation management. Thanks to Jonathan Downham, an advanced critical care practitioner in Warwick, U.K., for sharing this review.

 

Listen to the podcast

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UPDATED APRIL 16, 2020

From Brief19: COVID-19 and African Americans

Previous research has shown that minority populations in the United States tend to have worse clinical outcomes for common diseases like high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and other conditions. It appears that COVID-19 is no exception. A perspective piece published in JAMA takes a deep dive into some of the growing news on this important topic. In 131 predominantly black communities in the United States, infection and fatality rates from SARS-CoV-2 appear to be 3-fold and 6-fold greater, respectively, compared to predominantly white counties. Why is this happening?

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 16, 2020

How to take photos and request a derm consult in light of COVID-19

In an effort to conserve PPE and increase social distancing, many dermatology services have switched to a heavily telemedicine-based model. Dr. Steven Chen, a dermatologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, explains how to take photos and request a derm consult.

Read the tips

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UPDATED APRIL 15, 2020

From Brief 19: Universal testing in obstetrics reveals a high asymptomatic carrier rate for SARS-CoV-2

A new research letter in The New England Journal of Medicine described the use of universal SARS-CoV-2 testing carried out in two hospital obstetrics wards. New York Presbyterian Allen Hospital and Columbia University Irving Medical Center conducted a study from March 22 to April 4, 2020 of the 215 women who delivered at the facilities.

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 15, 2020

3D Printed Surgical Mask Straps

12-year-old Quinn Callander, a Scout from Vancouver, Canada, heard that a local hospital needed help with a unique problem: Its healthcare workers had significant ear pain after long shifts wearing masks continuously. He developed a simple “ear guard” using his 3D printer that prevents the elastic bands of a mask from rubbing against the backs of people’s ears. One of these ear guards made it all the way to Dr. Josh Landy, our Chief Medical Officer, who has been using his at work in the ICU. Callander has made the strap’s design available for others to download from the open-source 3D printing community Thingiverse. Download the files and print them for your hospital.

Access the ear guard 3D printing files

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UPDATED APRIL 14, 2020

From Brief19: New study questions the safety and efficacy of hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19

In a preprint of a randomized clinical trial posted in medRxiv, researchers in Brazil randomized patients to receive either the anti-malarial drug chloroquine (CQ) 600mg twice daily for ten days or 450mg low dose CQ for five days...

Read more in today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 14, 2020

The right clinical information, right where it's needed

BMJ Best Practice has developed a comprehensive guide on COVID-19, which covers the epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis, and management of the virus, and also includes guidelines and patient information.

See the guide

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UPDATED APRIL 13, 2020

Tips for the non-ICU doctor from Dr. Raj Dasgupta

As large numbers of COVID-19 patients are admitted to the ICU, the need for non-ICU clinicians to care for critically ill patients is increasing. Physicians, nurses, and healthcare professionals from specialties other than critical care medicine may be required to practice in a critical care environment. 

Dr. Raj Dasgupta, a pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine physician at Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California, will be sharing clinical pearls from his experience in the ICU.

Have questions about mechanical ventilation? Tap the button below. Dr. Raj will be answering your questions on April 21, 2020. Plus, see his first pearl — the 3 T’s of mechanical.

Ask your questions

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UPDATED APRIL 13, 2020

From Brief19: Compassionate Use Of Remdesivir For Patients With Severe Covid-19

A paper recently published in The New England Journal of Medicine describes the use of the anti-viral medication remdesivir in the treatment of patients with severe covid-19. Should we be excited by this paper? Should doctors be routinely using remdesivir for patients with severe covid-19?

Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 13, 2020

COVID-19 Resource Guide

This comprehensive resource guide includes a COVID-19 disease summary, a growing collection of research reviews, plus ICU and Australian guidelines. Thanks to Dr. Chris Nickson, an intensivist and clinical educator, and the ICU Team at The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, for sharing their COVID-19 resources.

Read the guide

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UPDATED APRIL 11, 2020

SARS-CoV-2 Gastrointestinal Infection Causing Hemorrhagic Colitis

A new case report published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology describes a patient that presents with bloody diarrhea in the absence of a fever or cough. A CT showed extensive colitis, and the patient was initially diagnosed with traveler’s diarrhea in light of recent travel to Egypt. Only later, after days in hospital, was COVID-19 diagnosed.
Thanks to Dr. Anthony T. DeBenedet and his co-authors, and to Dr. Brennan Spiegel, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, for sharing the case report.

Read the full case study

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UPDATED APRIL 10, 2020

From Brief19: What happens to children who get covid-19 in the United States?

A new report from the CDC describes pediatric outcomes of covid-19 in the United States. Most previous data on this topic came primarily from China and Spain. At the time of this report (through 2 April 2020), two percent of 149,760 laboratory-confirmed U.S. SARS-CoV-2 cases were diagnosed in children. While fever and cough are common in children with covid-19, these symptoms are not as common as they were in adults with covid-19...

Read today’s Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 9, 2020

From Brief19: SARS-CoV-2 And Blood Clots

There have been reports of SARS-CoV-2 patients with critical illness also developing abnormal blood clots. In a letter published in The New England Journal of Medicine, physicians from the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China describe three severely ill covid-19 patients who developed multiple infarcts in the brain. While this has been well-described in the medical literature, it is unknown how large the increase is during infections like SARS-CoV-2.

Read today’s Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 9, 2020

Expert Insights on COVID-19 with Elsevier

Elsevier has created a new podcast series for front-line clinicians and providers. In this three-part series, experts share their insights into the mode of transmission and pathophysiology of the virus, how medical informatics and telemedicine are used to manage the pandemic, and best practices for emergency nursing crisis preparedness.

Listen to the podcast

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UPDATED APRIL 8, 2020

From Brief19: CDC Begins Search For The True Denominator

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced that it will begin an attempt to determine how many total people in the United States have been infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. If this work is successful, it may help the CDC plan for future SARS-CoV-2 surveillance. The study will also help to provide a more accurate assessment of morbidity and mortality rates related to the infection.

Read today’s Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 8, 2020

Surviving Sepsis Campaign

Thanks to Dr. David Lyness, an intensive care medicine doctor and anaesthetist in Northern Ireland, for creating a summary of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for the Management of Critically Ill Adults with COVID-19.

Read the summary

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UPDATED APRIL 7, 2020

From Brief19: What Happened To Covid-19 Patients Admitted To The ICU In Italy?

A paper published in JAMA on April 6th describes the outcomes of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection who were admitted to Intensive Care Units in Lombardy, Italy. This study is notable for several reasons. First, this study represents the largest group of ICU patient outcomes described since the start of the covid-19 pandemic. Second, the authors shared intricate details in this publication, providing important insights into the needs of covid-19 patients ICUs. Finally, the results provide further evidence that older patients with chronic disease (high blood pressure, lung disease, etc) tend to fare poorly when they become sick with covid-19.

Read more about the study in today’s Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 6, 2020

From Brief19: Can Antihypertensives Help To Fight COVID-19?

In a paper published in the preprint journal medRxiv, researchers in Wuhan, China analyzed medical records of patients hospitalized with confirmed COVID-19. They separated patients with both COVID-19 and hypertension into two groups: patients who had been prescribed the antihypertensives “ACE inhibitors” and “ARBs,” and patients who had not been prescribed these. The question: do ACE inhibitors or ARBs have any effect on COVID-19? As previously covered in Brief19, experts have debated the use of these medications. In this new study, researchers found that patients taking ACE inhibitors and ARBs were much less likely to develop “very severe” COVID-19, and had lower death rates… Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 4, 2020

Ventilator basics

Thanks to "New England Nurse," an MICU nurse, for sharing this guide to ventilators for the non-ICU nurse. 

 

Read the guide

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UPDATED APRIL 3, 2020

From Brief19: More Studies On Hydroxychloroquine, Same “Iffy” Results

Once obscure, known mainly to patients with rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, hydroxychloroquine is now quite famous, despite limited data supporting its use for covid-19. Nevertheless, President Trump recently hailed (on Twitter) hydroxychloroquine as a potential cure for covid-19. So far, no high quality data supports this claim. Numerous low quality studies have been published on this topic though. Now another study has been published assessing hydroxychloroquine in a “preprint” non-peer reviewed medical journal medRxiv. The primary goal of the trial was to measure how long it took patients to recover (both overall and with respect to lung health). However, the scientific methods used in the study were so seriously flawed that the results are almost impossible to take seriously. Sadly, this trial does not provide the answers we need... Read today's Brief19

Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of #covid-19 research and policy.

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UPDATED APRIL 2, 2020

A call for chest X-rays to develop new COVID-19 screening tool

Researchers at the University of Waterloo and Darwin AI have launched an open-source project to improve COVID-19 screening using artificial intelligence and chest X-rays. 

 

The team is currently looking to collect more chest X-ray data, which is needed to teach the AI models they are building. Do you have chest X-rays (PA or AP view) of patients with COVID-19? Share them on Figure 1 using the hashtag #covid-19 or via the link below to contribute to the project. 

All data and learnings from this initiative will be made publicly available to the community.

Share a COVID-19 chest X-ray

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UPDATED APRIL 2, 2020

From Brief19: Initial Observations Of Covid-19 Patients In Critical Care In Three Cities

In a paper published in Anesthesia & Analgesia, a group of intensive care doctors from Seattle, New York City, and Chicago report on their experiences with the covid-19 epidemic to-date. While reports from China and Italy described the initial presenting symptoms of covid-19 as a influenza-like illness, the authors report that the general presentation of patients admitted to the ICU had complaints including “chest pain, headaches, altered mental status” and gastrointestinal symptoms such as “nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea.” 

 

Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of #covid-19 research and policy.

Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED APRIL 2, 2020

Diagnosis and Management of COVID-19 Disease

Read the American Thoracic Society’s rapid response packet on the diagnosis and management of #covid-19. This document summarizes the most recent knowledge regarding the biology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of covid-19.

 

Thanks to the American Thoracic Society for publishing on March 30, 2020.

 

See the document

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UPDATED APRIL 1, 2020

From Brief19: Multiple patients on a single mechanical ventilator?

Recently, the notion of splitting single mechanical ventilators over multiple patients in acute respiratory failure has come to the forefront, especially as New York City may run out of ventilators as soon as April 1st. The Society of Critical Care Medicine led a consortium of groups in developing a consensus statement addressing the concept, released on March 26, 2020. The article recommends against using a single mechanical ventilator for multiple patients. Reasons for this include variability of patients’ lung needs and concerns related to engineering. These limitations, however, can be overcome in some cases... Given New York City’s trajectory in the covid-19 pandemic, the need to maintain multiple patients on a single mechanical ventilator may soon become a reality. Read today's Brief19

Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of #covid-19 research and policy. 

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UPDATED APRIL 1, 2020

COVID-19 Treatment Protocol

A #COVID19 treatment algorithm shared by the Department of Internal Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine.

See the algorithm

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UPDATED MARCH 31, 2020

From Brief19: Covid-19 patients requiring the ICU have high mortality rates

A new report published in the New England Journal of Medicine yesterday describes the outcomes of twenty-four patients who were hospitalized in nine Seattle-area hospitals and who required treatment in intensive care units for novel coronavirus. As of March 23, half of these ICU patients had died, 13 percent remained on breathing machines (in the ICU), 17 percent remained in the hospital but had improved so as to permit leaving the ICU, and 21 percent had been able to go home.

Read today’s Brief19

Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of #Covid-19 research and policy.

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UPDATED MARCH 31, 2020

Covidprotocols.org

Covidprotocols.org is a Brigham and Women's Hospital project for clinical management guidelines for COVID patients. Targeted towards intensivists and hospitalists, it was compiled by over 50 content experts in 15 different departments. It is kept up to date with the help of users as new data comes out. 
Shared with permission from Brigham and Women's. 

See the guidelines

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UPDATED MARCH 31, 2020

Cheat sheets for non-ICU clinicians

Thanks to Dr. Daniyal Hashmi, a chief resident in Washington DC, and future pulmonary and critical care medicine fellow at Henry Ford Hospital, for sharing these cheat sheets for non-ICU clinicians. Topics include: basics of mechanical ventilation, ARDR overview, APRV overview, shock, sepsis, and choosing respiratory support.

See the cheat sheets

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UPDATED MARCH 30, 2020

COVID-19: Describing a new disease

Thanks to Doctors Aaron Richterman and Eric Meyerowitz for sharing this comprehensive review of COVID-19. The presentation was originally given at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School’s joint infectious diseases conference.

See the video

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UPDATED MARCH 30, 2020

Ventilator Troubleshooting

Thanks to Dr. Nick Mark, a Seattle-based intensivist for sharing this one-pager on how to troubleshoot the high pressure alarm on the ventilator.

Access the document

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UPDATED MARCH 29, 2020

Should COVID-19 isolation be extended to 21 days?

An article published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, by Char Leung, questions the value of the current 14-day quarantine being implemented by health authorities globally for COVID-19. The study collected data from individual cases reported by the media which included information on location, gender, age, symptoms, time of exposure, time of first symptom onset, and type of exposure. Type of exposure was defined as either travellers or non-travellers. Significant differences were seen in the distribution of incubation periods between travellers and non-travellers. Due to the high variability of the incubation period, it is suggested that the duration of the quarantine period of three weeks is deemed more suitable.

Read the full study

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UPDATED MARCH 29, 2020

Assessing the impact of COVID-19: A global survey

The University of Alberta, Department of Psychology is conducting research on the way the current pandemic novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is impacting people's well-being. Dr. Norman R. Brown and Eamin Zahan Heanoy are looking for participants from around the world to complete a short online survey regarding their experience dealing with the global outbreak.

Participate in the study

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UPDATED MARCH 29, 2020

Covid-19 Cookbook

Here is a one-page COVID-19 Cookbook, developed by Mark B. Reid, an academic hospitalist from Denver, USA. His goal was to create a simple document any outpatient MD could use to admit COVID inpatients.

Access the document

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UPDATED MARCH 28, 2020

From Brief19: Does donated plasma cure COVID-19 for patients in critical condition?

In a paper published in JAMA, investigators from China treated five critically ill covid-19 patients with plasma donated from patients who had already recovered from SARS-CoV-2. “Convalescent plasma” contains antibodies that the body manufactures in bulk when fighting an infection. Four of five patients had substantial improvement in their breathing while using mechanical ventilation within 12 days. Three of five patients were discharged from the hospital; the remaining two are in stable condition. However, this was a non-randomized study in five patients with a disease that often improves on its own...

Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of #covid-19 research and policy. 

 

Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED MARCH 28, 2020

COVID-19 Toolkit

This COVID-19 Toolkit from Elsevier includes evidence-based clinical resources covering topics from symptom management to diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing wellness. 

 

Thanks to Elsevier for sharing these COVID-19 related materials. 

 

Access the Clinical Toolkit

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UPDATED MARCH 27, 2020

From Brief19: Can the SARS-nCov-2 infection be transmitted to the fetus?

Two papers appeared in JAMA today, both from investigators in Wuhan, China. In one, a woman with a SARS-Cov-2 positive test during the last twenty-three days of her pregnancy gave birth to a newborn who subsequently was found to have elevated immune markers (IgM antibodies) against the SARS-Cov-2 virus, as well as elevated inflammatory markers (cytokines). Both of these findings are suggestive of active or recent infection. A second JAMA paper describes a case series of six pregnant women with SARS-Cov-2. All six infected women underwent cesarean section and delivered healthy babies. All six of the babies were tested and were found to be negative for the SARS-Cov-2 virus… 

Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of #covid-19 research and policy. Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED MARCH 27, 2020

Mask basics

Thanks to Dr. Salim R. Rezaie and the Rebel EM team for sharing this one pager on Mask Basics.

See more

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UPDATED MARCH 26, 2020

Fair Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources in the Time of Covid-19

This article from the New England Journal of Medicine outlines six recommendations for the ethical allocation of medical resources in the Covid-19 pandemic. These recommendations can be used to develop guidelines to help ensure that individual doctors are never tasked with deciding unaided which patients receive life-saving care and which do not.

Read the article

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UPDATED MARCH 26, 2020

From Brief19: How is the covid-19 pandemic affecting healthcare workers?

In a study published in JAMA Network Open, researchers from China surveyed 1,257 health care workers in 34 hospitals from January 29, 2020, to February 3, 2020, in China who were directly involved in caring for patients with covid-19. Healthcare workers experienced profound psychological burden caring for these patients: 50.4 percent had symptoms of depression, 44.6 percent had anxiety, 71.5 percent reported symptoms of psychological distress. Inhabitants of Wuhan were particularly affected. Will New York City become the next Wuhan? 

 

Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of covid-19 research and policy.

Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED MARCH 25, 2020

From Brief19: New York bolsters its workforce at any cost

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced sweeping deregulations governing the practice of medicine as part of an executive order aimed at bolstering New York’s healthcare workforce. The executive order included provisions that remove supervision requirements of nurse practitioners and physician assistants, allow international medical graduates to practice without a license (provided they meet other requirements), allow retired physicians to resume practice, and most controversially, remove work hour restrictions from resident physicians and post-residency fellows in specialty training. New York had been the only state codifying work hour restrictions of residents and fellows. Shared with permission from Brief19, a daily review of covid-19 research and policy.

Read today's Brief19

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UPDATED MARCH 25, 2020

University of Washington Medicine COVID-19 Resource Site

The clinical and administrative teams throughout the University of Washington health system have developed a number of protocols and policies in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including ones focused on drive-thru testing and discharge policies.

Thanks to John Lynch, an Infectious Diseases Specialist from Washington, for sharing.

Posted by Figure 1 on March 25, 2020.

Read the guide

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UPDATED MARCH 25, 2020

Medical Student COVID-19 Curriculum

Last week, a group of students at Harvard Medical School formed a Response Team to organize their efforts against COVID-19. One of the group’s efforts was to create a curriculum on what every medical student should know about the pandemic. The guide includes basic science, epidemiology, clinical management, testing, vaccines, the current state of the epidemic in MA, and how to have difficult conversations about COVID-19.

Read the curriculum

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UPDATED MARCH 24, 2020

COVID-19: A conversation with colleagues in Italy

Listen to the experiences of two physicians working in Italy during the pandemic. Marco Ripa, a researcher and infectious disease physician and Giacomo Monti, a consultant in anesthesia and intensive care, share their perspectives with Mike Rose of Clinical Problem Solvers.

Listen to the podcast

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UPDATED MARCH 24, 2020

From Cleveland Clinic: A Pulmonary Pathologist’s Perspective on COVID-19

In this 15-minute video, an expert in lung pathology presents an overview of COVID-19, starting with the global numbers and ending with what he and other pathologists are seeing under their microscopes. He explains the histology of acute respiratory distress syndrome, highlights the diffuse alveolar damage seen in patients who are infected with the virus and offers a patient-friendly explanation of alveolar function and hypoxia.

Watch the video

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UPDATED MARCH 23, 2020

Video: COVID-19 and the Cardiovascular System This video, from Dr. Jay Mohan, an Interventional Fellow from Michigan, demonstrates what we currently know about COVID-19 and its effects on the cardiovascular system.

Watch the video

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UPDATED MARCH 23, 2020

Leveraging lung ultrasound to diagnose and monitor COVID-19

Watch an on-demand webinar with Dr. John Martin (Chief Medical Officer), Rick Mendez (Head of Clinical Development), and Dr. Mike Stone (Head of Education) of Butterfly iQ and special guest, Dr. Yale Tung Chen, that discusses how to leverage lung ultrasound to diagnose and monitor COVID-19.
Dr. Chen tested positive for COVID-19 on March 9 and used the Butterfly iQ to track the progression of his condition. He spoke about his experience and the value of POCUS during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Access the webinar

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UPDATED MARCH 22, 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Infection control and prevention measures

This Cochrane Library Special Collection pulls together the Cochrane Reviews that are identified as most directly relevant to the prevention of infection.

Access the special collection here

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UPDATED MARCH 22, 2020

Communicating with Spanish-speaking patients?View the printable translation resource for communicating with Spanish-speaking patients about the coronavirus.

Thanks to medical student Frida Teran for sharing this resource.

See the document

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UPDATED MARCH 22, 2020

Tracking the most recent publications and literature about the 2019 Coronavirus

Litcovid is a curated literature hub for tracking up-to-date scientific information about the 2019 novel Coronavirus. The articles are updated daily and are further categorized by different research topics and geographic locations for improved access.

 

Thanks to NIH for sharing such comprehensive resources on the outbreak.

View the resources

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UPDATED MARCH 21, 2020

Help reduce accidental transmission of #COVID-19

A helpful tip from Dr. Matthew Markert, an Epileptologist from Stanford, on how to stop touching your face and help reduce accidental transmission of COVID-19.

Watch the video

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UPDATED MARCH 21, 2020

“The CDC Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) has only ~10,000 ventilators.”

As many hospitals face a shortage of ventilators during this time, the 1 Million Ventilators project is trying to develop a strategic reserve of 1,000,000+ emergency ventilators. They aim to design and produce emergency ventilators, train thousands to operate them, and dynamically track ventilator supply and demand by hospital to efficiently distribute additional ventilators to hospitals with the highest unmet demand. 

Rafi Yusuf, a family practitioner in Queens, New York, is looking for critical care physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, or other specialists willing and able to volunteer remotely for this project. 

See more information

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UPDATED MARCH 20, 2020

COVID-19: An approach for EMS 

Paramedic Bryan Johnson provides an informative presentation on COVID-19 for EMS responders, including what the virus looks like clinically, recommendations for screening, the projected stages of illness, and assessing the risk of mortality. Plus, how to protect yourself. 

See the full presentation

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UPDATED MARCH 20, 2020

How to use one ventilator to save multiple lives

In this video, emergency medicine physician Dr. Charlene Irvin Babcock shows how to modify one ventilator to ventilate two or four patients simultaneously if you are experiencing a shortage of ventilators due to COVID-19.


Watch the video

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UPDATED MARCH 19, 2020

CT Findings in COVID-19

Dr. Javad Azadi, from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Radiology Department, reviews the literature on CT imaging in COVID-19 and explains the role of imaging in the diagnosis of the virus. 
Many thanks to Dr. Javad Azadi, Dr. Pamela Johnson, and Radiology RSNA for sharing these important findings. 


Watch the full video

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UPDATED MARCH 19, 2020

COVID-19 is not just a cough

Dr. Brennan Spiegel, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, reviews the findings of a newly-published study from Wuhan, China that reveals digestive symptoms are a prominent feature of COVID-19. The study, which analyzed 204 patients with COVID-19, reports that 48.5% of patients presented to hospital with digestive symptoms as their chief complaint. 

Dr. Spiegel notes, “currently symptoms like diarrhea are not part of the #COVID-19 diagnostic checklist. But new data suggest it’s more common than thought…”

Read more about the study

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UPDATED MARCH 18, 2020